Episode 272

How to Finally Write a Nonfiction Book that Helps You Get More Leads and Sales and Massively Impact the World with Julie Eason

How to finally write a nonfiction book that helps you get more leads and sales and massively impact the world with Julie Eason is the topic of this LMScast hosted by Chris Badgett of LifterLMS. Julie shares her experience working with authors, such as Russell Brunson, publishing books in the online business space, and what course creators can do to engage more people with tools outside of the course program itself.

How to finally write a nonfiction book that helps you get more leads and sales and massively impact the world with Julie Eason

Julie is an expert in writing books, and she helps ghost write books for people. When it comes to course creation, people talk a lot about YouTube and Facebook ads for lead generation. But Amazon is also a very popular search engine and can be a great marketing tool for course creators. If you have a non-fiction book in a specific niche, selling a book on Amazon may be an approach to consider.

Instead of thinking, “What do I want to say?” when creating a course, think about, “What do my students want?” This mentality shift allows you to take an approach that is results oriented for students. It also helps you form your material in such a way that it appeals to what students are looking to get from your course when they purchase.

In your sales funnel, the purpose of your book is to help students diagnose their problem and help them to figure out that you have a solution in the form of your online course. People reading about your niche in a book may realize they have a specific problem or are looking to achieve a specific goal, and the purpose of your book is to take them from the problem aware state to a solution aware state. Then you can offer your product as one possibility they can pursue to achieve that solution.

One great use case for a book in a course sales funnel would be to have a book with interesting and diverse case studies about people who have been through your program and what results they have achieved. This is a great means of objection handling and convincing your students that they can get a certain result from your program.

Julie has a video for LMScast listeners at NonfictionBookAcademy.com/LMScast where she talks with Russell Brunson about the process of writing his first two books with her. She also has great tools available at NonFictionBookAcademy.com for how you can write your book, market it, and best utilize it as an asset for your business.

At LifterLMS.com you can learn more about new developments and how you can use LifterLMS to build online courses and membership sites. If you like this episode of LMScast, you can browse more episodes here. Subscribe to our newsletter for updates, developments, and future episodes of LMScast. Thank you for joining us!

EPISODE TRANSCRIPT

Chris Badgett:

You’ve come to the right place if you’re a course creator looking to build more impact, income and freedom. LMScast is the number one podcast for course creators just like you. I’m your guide, Chris Badgett. I’m the co-founder of the most powerful tool for building, selling, and protecting engaging online courses called LifterLMS. Enjoy the show.

Chris Badgett:

Hello, and welcome back to another episode of LMScast. My name is Chris Badgett, and I’m joined by a special guest, Julie Eason, from Thanet House Publishing. You can find her at thanethousebooks.com. Welcome to the show, Julie.

Julie Eason:

Thanks, Chris, I’m so excited to be here.

Chris Badgett:

I’m super stoked to get into this with you. And the way I want to frame in this conversation is, well, first of all, you’re an expert at writing books and helping ghost write books for people. And for a course creator, someone building a training based membership site, everybody talks about YouTube as lead gen, Facebook ads or whatever, but Amazon is also quite a large search engine and if you have a nonfiction book especially if you’re really niched down, it can be a great legion for you. We just recorded a podcast episode with one of the LifterLMS course creators. Her name is Angela Brown. And in four years she grew her YouTube channel to 60,000 subscribers, she has a book on Amazon, has over 200 five star reviews. And she’s in the house cleaning niche. She helps house-

Julie Eason:

I love that, yeah.

Chris Badgett:

She helps house cleaners basically go from amateur to professional. And the book has played a huge part in her development. And I was just blown away. So I’m really excited to get in with you. Some of you watching or listening may not know this, my background is in social sciences, cultural anthropology. So when I look at things from a marketing perspective, I have my anthropology glasses on, I’m a very observant person. And one of the things about studying cultures is that people have artifacts. And one of those artifacts in a niche or a group or a subculture is a book.

Chris Badgett:

So in general, entrepreneurship one of those artifacts is The Lean Startup by Eric Ries, or The 4-Hour Workweek by Tim Ferriss. But when you get into course creation, this book comes up which is called Expert Secrets, which is from Russell Brunson over at ClickFunnels. But you actually wrote this book, and that’s why I wanted to get you on the show.

Julie Eason:

I did. I was the ghostwriter. And before anybody goes, “What? What a cheat?” So here’s the deal with ghostwriting, this is how it works-

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

… in the real world. In the world of real books as opposed to books that people just whip out, they have somebody in the Philippines transcribe an interview or something, that’s not how we work, we’re writing legit books. And the author does as much work as the ghostwriter. Because they have to be the one with the ideas and the frameworks and I have a unique background, in that I was a copywriter for 25 years and I’m in the digital… I’ve been in the digital marketing space since before it was a term. So I’ve watched it develop and I’ve watched the gurus come and go. I’ve watched when Frank Kern was a baby, this kind of stuff.

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

I have a unique perspective. And I bring that to our authors, so that I can ask them questions they may not have thought about. But yeah, so I wrote the book, but he’s the genius behind all of the content and the way that it’s presented. But as far as structure goes, yeah, that was all me.

Chris Badgett:

I love your point, it’s a collaboration. It’s not just a tactic that you just outsource, “Oh, I’m going to do a book. Who can I find to do a book?” You need to invest your own time and help the ghostwriter suck it out of your head and make it approachable to the reader.

Julie Eason:

You got to have something in your head to start with. And the problem that people have when they try to write books is in many instances they think, “Oh, I’ve got writer’s block. Oh, the blank page is my enemy.” It’s not because you don’t know what to say, it’s because you have too much to say. And you get a logjam. And that is what I specialize in helping people. Whether it’s through… I have my own courses, so my course or whether we’re doing it in person, let’s clear out the logjam and let’s find what’s really important for the reader and for you and make the book that actually is going to move the needle.

Chris Badgett:

That’s awesome. And just so you know, if you’re listening, there’s like three conversations we’re having here at once. One is we’re talking about having a book funnel for your online course, your membership site. We’re talking about the act of writing a book. Book writing is also very similar to course creation, there’s a lot of overlap. And copywriting is important. So there’s four conversations. The fifth conversation is, Julie is a very talented entrepreneur that I have a lot of respect for. So just in general, there’s a lot of general entrepreneur’s stuff going on here. So this is going to be a really good conversation-

Julie Eason:

We should have a retreat. We should have a Lifter retreat and just have everybody come and you and I can just riff on stuff, all day long.

Chris Badgett:

That would be awesome. And this is a fun fact, this is a fun fact for the people that are listening and watching, Julie and I actually, we just found out about six months ago or so that we live like literally 20 minutes down the road from each other. Which is a lot of fun. I keep looking for her at the Farmers Market. I haven’t seen her yet but eventually-

Julie Eason:

We keep missing each other. I think we’re on opposite schedules. Yeah. And it’s funny because he said this morning when we got on, before we started recording this, like, “Oh, why aren’t we doing this in person?” “I don’t know. I didn’t even think about it.” Because we’re so used to doing everything digitally.

Chris Badgett:

Yeah, it’s so true. Well let’s talk about the logjam.

Julie Eason:

Yeah.

Chris Badgett:

So at LifterLMS, we help course creators create, launch and scale on the WordPress website that they own and control. But one of the ways that we help people create is… That’s why we invented this podcast, because even though we’re a software company, we’re in the course creator success business. And people need more than just software to be successful. So one of the things that gets people hung up as an expert, is the curse of knowledge, writer’s block, course creators block, “Which course should I make?” Giant logjam. So what can we learn from you in the book world that course creators can take away?

Julie Eason:

So yeah, it’s about cataloging your expertise, I think really is what we’re trying to do here. And the problem that occurs is people, when they think about a book, books are valuable, they have high perceived value because that was the very first job we ever learned when we were kids, right? You got to learn how to read. Our parents told us that, our teachers told us that, we learned that all the answers are in the book. Our whole lives have been revolving around books.

Julie Eason:

And so that automatically puts it as a huge value offer for, if you have a course you give away a free book or you use a free book as a lead gen to your course whatever it is, but it doesn’t really matter what product you’re putting out, what matters is how you can help people get a result, right?

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

Teach them how to play guitar, teach them how to be better housekeepers, teach them how to run a business, whatever you’re trying to do, that you’re an expert in, you need to be able to take your years or decades of experience and actually create something that people can use. People can’t use verbal vomit on a page. They can’t. They don’t know where to go. And I know course creators have this issue because I had the same issue when I created courses, it’s like, “Oh my gosh, I could do so much.”

Julie Eason:

So what you got to do is instead of thinking, “What do I want to say?” That’s what every book… Well, this is what I want to write. And here’s my outline and it’s ten miles long. You got to go from the outside in. Get super, super clear on who is your audience. What do they want? And what do they think is standing in their way, and what’s actually standing in their way. So you got to work from their perspective and what is it they’re trying to achieve? Do they want to learn to play piano? Do they want to learn to run a housekeeping business? Whatever it is, what do they need to know, to take the first step towards actually achieving that goal?

Julie Eason:

And it might be that your book only gets them one step. It might be that your book gets them all the way there, that’s fine. But you need to think about their needs first. And then all right, what do I need out of this book? So we call it audience purpose and goal. The audience is, who is it what do they want? The purpose is, what am I going to deliver to them that’s going to give them what they want or get them one step closer to what they want? In a course creator situation, if you’re using it as a lead magnet, you want to get them right up to the point where they’re perfectly positioned to buy your course.

Julie Eason:

So there’s a whole lot of people out here who are thinking about things and they might be in an early stage and you want to reach those people but they are cold traffic. They’re only worried about themselves and their problems, right? So you got to warm them up by getting them to understand you have a solution. So that was an off track thing. But what you want to do is, your that’s your purpose. The book’s purpose is to get them to a point. The goal is-

Chris Badgett:

One of my business coaches, his name’s Dan Martell, he talks about his goal is to convert decades into days with his training and stuff.

Julie Eason:

Yeah.

Chris Badgett:

So how does an expert condense decades into days through a book or outline or course or whatever. How do we make that possible? How do we remove the logjam-

Julie Eason:

By thinking audience purpose and goal.

Chris Badgett:

Okay.

Julie Eason:

Like going outside and going, “Okay, what do they want? What do they think they need?” And you’re going to give that to them in the sales copy and you’re going to give them what they think they need, but also you know what they actually need. Because you’re the expert.

Chris Badgett:

Let’s do a fun exercise here, so-

Julie Eason:

Yeah.

Chris Badgett:

… Russell Brunson, Expert Secrets, we share a very similar audience of… There’s a lot of overlap between our audiences. And I’ve got here, this is Russell’s challenge right here, the-

Julie Eason:

One Funnel Away, yeah.

Chris Badgett:

… One Funnel Away Challenge. Before we get into some of this stuff, what do you know, in your work, that you found out about experts who are a big percentage of the people who listen to this podcast, what do you know about them that allows this book to come out and be super useful? And I hear people reference his book all the time, and how-

Julie Eason:

All the time.

Chris Badgett:

Yeah. When you get inside the mind of the expert, what do you see?

Julie Eason:

I see that they are incredibly knowledgeable. And they can change the world with their knowledge. And they don’t believe it.

Chris Badgett:

They don’t believe they can do it, or they haven’t-

Julie Eason:

Some of them don’t believe they can do it. They don’t believe they’re that great. They think what they actually are super genius at is no big deal. They think that, “Who would want what I’ve got?” And this is all deep down. They will never admit that. But I know it because I have it, everybody has it. As human beings, we’re conditioned to fit into a group. It’s social anthropology, we’re conditioned to do whatever needs to be done to stay a member of our group and to be cohesive and everything’s fine and we’re not going to get thrown out in the wild and get eaten by wolves.

Julie Eason:

So all of that is down deep. And it’s something that you may not even think about, but if you are running around in circles writing your course, over and over and over again. “Oh, it’s not ready to launch yet.” Well, why? It’s because [crosstalk 00:12:08].

Chris Badgett:

Well, let me ask you this, I was on your website, which is thanethousebooks.com, and I watched, before this interview, Russell Brunson’s testimonial for you. And he said he had had this book idea. And he said it was funny to say out loud that he’d been working on for like, 12 years or something.

Julie Eason:

Yeah. Yeah.

Chris Badgett:

So tell us about that.

Julie Eason:

So I’m going to tell you the short story and if you really want to know more about all that, there’s a whole video I’ll find for you guys that’s him and me riffing on Expert Secrets and how we made it and all that stuff. And it’s really cool. And it will [crosstalk 00:12:44].

Chris Badgett:

Well, we’ll put that in the show notes. It’s on YouTube?

Julie Eason:

Yeah, we’ll put that in the show notes.

Chris Badgett:

Okay.

Julie Eason:

Actually, what I’ll do, is I’ll make, just for you guys, because I love you Chris. And it’s awesome. And I want to give you as much as I can. I’m going to make a special page for you. I’ll put nonfictionbookacademy.com and I’ll put LMScast at the end.

Chris Badgett:

Okay.

Julie Eason:

And I’ll put that video up there with me and Russell so that you guys can dig into all that because it’s fun. But I want to get to what I can do to help your people.

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

So the reason that he held back for nine years is because writing a book is freaking hard. It’s not the same as writing sales copy. He’s a great writer. He is a great writer. He’d been writing sales copy forever. He was teaching Dan Kennedy’s Mastermind people. For crying out loud, he was not a writing slouch. And the problem was, is that when you start thinking about a book, you got that, “Oh, wow, books have all the answers.”

Chris Badgett:

Yeah it’s.

Julie Eason:

I know that because I went to school. Books have all the answers and authors are really, really important. And I want this. What it really is, is that they want the book to do everything that they know it can do if it’s done well. And so they put all this pressure on yourself. And you’re like, “Ah, I’ve got to deliver everything I know. And I’ve got it…” It’s like, “No, Russell, let’s do one…” we had one goal with first book.comsecrets, that goal was to launch ClickFunnels. He needed to have a way to explain to people, what was a funnel, who it could help and why they should even pay attention and why they should be doing those instead of websites. And how that software could help them, right?

Julie Eason:

And so that’s what we did in the book. I’m like, “I know you know all this other stuff.” And after two books with me, he’s like, “All right, now I know how to do this.” And so now he’s got a whole writing team, and he puts out books all the time. All the time. So it really comes down to understand that you have decades of knowledge. That reader doesn’t need decades of knowledge, that reader needs one solution to one problem that will get them to the point where they can jump off and go into your world and learn everything you have to… And buy everything that you have to teach, right? So I call it inspire, educate, sell.

Julie Eason:

You have to inspire people in your book or your course, to believe they can do it. That’s that deep down belief that, “Ah, you did it, but I don’t think I could do it.” And then educate them, so they know how to do it because it’s terrible to believe you can do something and not know how to do it. And then you’ll have to sell them resources and support because how many times have you bought a course and never done the thing? Right? How many times have you read a book and been all excited and, “I know how to do it.” And then you get distracted? You need to support these people. That’s where your course comes in. That’s where your products come in.

Julie Eason:

So it’s all three of those things in a book that are going to lead people down the path, into your world, introduce them, solve a problem, get them a good quick win. And then be like, “All right, you did this one thing, how about all the rest of this stuff? Come join me on my expert platform, and let me help you.”

Chris Badgett:

Can you explain, a book funnel? Just what [crosstalk 00:15:48]?

Julie Eason:

Yes, I can.

Chris Badgett:

Okay.

Julie Eason:

So what is the purpose of this book funnel that you want? Are you talking about a Free Plus Shipping funnel? Are you talking about… Is it to get people to buy a course? What-

Chris Badgett:

Well, I mean if we can-

Julie Eason:

Find the goal.

Chris Badgett:

Okay. Russell is a software company, feel free to use that as an example about funnel. And the Free Plus Shipping strategy I think is interesting. But for a course creator, specifically somebody building a training based membership site, what is it and how do they get moving on that project with reasonable expectations?

Julie Eason:

So we’ve already written a book, and now we want to use it to bring people to a course?

Chris Badgett:

Yeah. Or a membership site, either way.

Julie Eason:

Or membership site.

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

I kind of combine those terms. But yeah, okay. So it depends on what you wrote the book about, first of all. This is why I do book development, is so important at the very beginning is you want to plan the book to do what it’s going to do in the funnel. Like-

Chris Badgett:

The jobs to be done.

Julie Eason:

Right. What are you going to use this? It’s not just, “I’m writing a book so I can be a best selling author,” which is all over internet right now, “Be this authority.”

Chris Badgett:

About being an authority or an influence or-

Julie Eason:

“Be an authority. You have this incredible…” No. Let’s get the book to actually do a job and build your credibility, right? So anyway, besides that, so the final steps are simply, you’re converting cold traffic to a customer, right? And so people think, “Oh, this book is going to get people to buy. So I’m going to sell the crap out of my product in the book, and then people are just going to buy it. And I’ll just give it away. And I’ll do Free Plus Shipping and all of these things,” which are great tactics. But you got to realize there’s more conversions that happen in the process than just, “You got my book for free, go buy my stuff.” There’s more that happens in there.

Julie Eason:

So the funnel is just, maybe you have… I’ll just run through a simple Free Plus Shipping funnel. You’re offering people a book, which is a solution, which is a high perceived value solution to something that they have a problem with. Cold traffic is problem aware, they don’t understand, this is straight out of Expert Secrets, they don’t understand that you exist or that your solution exists or even that a solution exists. They just are completely in their head about this problem. So your book is going to help solve that problem. And you’re like, “Oh my gosh, I can get it for free. I have to pay shipping,” or there’s lots of other ways you can do it. You can be like, “You pay shipping, and I’ll give you the book for free.” Or, “You buy the book, and I’ll pay the shipping.” Right? There’s ways to play with that.

Julie Eason:

But you’re getting the book into their hands. The next step in the funnel, if you’re using this particular funnel model, you’re going to have an order bump, which is just a little checkbox, it’s like, “Hey, the print book is on its way. We’re so excited for that.” What else do you have that would be valuable to them that they can simply go, “Oh, hell yes, add that on for 10 bucks,” right? Something sort of low price. Russell uses his audio book, people love the audio book. So they’ll buy the same book three times in his funnel. They’ll buy it as the print book for Free Plus Shipping and then the audio bump might be $30. And they’ll just go, “Yes, I want the audio book because I want to listen to it right now.” Maybe it’s an ebook, maybe it’s a workbook that goes with it. Whatever it is, you have a little order bump.

Julie Eason:

So that pays for your advertising. The Free Plus Shipping, you’re going to break even on the book, your order bump is going to help pay for all the ads that you have to run to get that cold traffic. Now, whether you use paid ads or [crosstalk 00:19:26].

Chris Badgett:

So you’re saying it’s a self-liquidating offer?

Julie Eason:

A self-liquidating offer, exactly. Let’s use that terminology. It’s going to pay for all that stuff. Then you have, “All right, what’s the next problem in line?” The thing is, is that your book is, as soon as they buy it, they assume the problem is solved.

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

Right? But you’re-

Chris Badgett:

That’s an issue.

Julie Eason:

… an incredible expert.

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

So why are you continuing to try to solve the problem? This is what course people do all the time, is they’re like, “Oh, I’m going to pile on my upsells as more stuff to solve the same problem.” But psychologically, they’ve already solved that problem because they bought the book, right?

Chris Badgett:

Right.

Julie Eason:

Whether or not that’s true, they don’t know yet. I don’t remember who did this, but I saw this fantastic analogy, if you’ve ever read the book, If You Give a Mouse a Cookie, you ever actually read that book?

Chris Badgett:

I haven’t read that one.

Julie Eason:

It’s a children’s book and it’s amazing. You go to any Barnes & Noble, any library they’ve got, there’s a whole series of it. If You Give a Moose a Muffin, is the main version of it.

Chris Badgett:

Okay.

Julie Eason:

So if you give a mouse a cookie, he’s going to want a glass of milk.

Chris Badgett:

That’s a different thing.

Julie Eason:

It’s a different thing.

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

Because now, he was hungry, he wanted a cookie, then he’s thirsty, he wants glass of milk, right? And then he’s like, oh, well, if you give him a glass of milk, he wants the next… I really should memorize this, because I’m starting to use this in my talks all the time. But you’re basically, what’s the next problem they have to solve? So for me-

Chris Badgett:

Sequencing.

Julie Eason:

… I’m going to help you with this particular book. I’m going to help you understand how a chord or how a book can help your business. Great. So then you’re going to need to know how to write the book. Cool. Got a course for that, then oh my gosh, if I write the book then I don’t know how to publish it. I’ve heard it’s really hard to publish. So then it’s like, boom you got that, and that’s the next thing.

Julie Eason:

So the funnels are just, what’s the next thing that needs to be solved? And you offer that… And I mean, there’s people who offer 20, Russell used to be one of these people, I’m glad he’s not anymore. Give offer after offer, after offer, after offer. I think with a book, it’s like, give them the book, do a little order bump, do an upsell for something that solves the next problem that’s at a moderate, maybe it’s $200, maybe it’s $100, whatever, but it gets them the next solution. Then they’re on your list, you’ve made money in the funnel.

Julie Eason:

Maybe if they turn that down, you have a down sell, where it’s like, “Okay, you didn’t want that thing, but what about this?” Then you can continue to sell them. Then you can get them into your course depending on the price points of your course and how many modules there are and how many things you can give them. A piece of your course, you can splinter it off and be like, “This is the next thing they need.” So give that to them for 100 bucks, and then they can buy the thousand dollar course.

Julie Eason:

So a funnel is just a path. It’s just a customer journey. But the biggest mistake people make is that they’re trying to pile on more. And here’s the thing, is because it’s confusing, right? Because an order bump, that little checkbox, is just adding more of the same thing. But it’s in a different format. And the reason that Russell figured that out is because when he had a supplement company, people would just buy six bottles. Like, “Do you want one bottle for free? Great. Well, here’s three more bottles for a discount.” Or whatever, and people would just add it on. So that’s like an afterthought checklist. And it is the same thing, but then they make the mistake of, “Okay, I’m going to just keep solving the same problem with more products.” And that it’s not helpful for the person because they’re problem aware. Right now they’re just trying to solve the problem.

Chris Badgett:

Wow, that was worth the price of admission. Completely worth. Let’s go outside of tactic land, you’re already outside of tactic land, but I just want to go into a strategy thing here where I think Russell calls it the big idea, what’s the big idea that people need to have for the next thing to happen or whatever. So for him, I think the job to be done of this book is the big idea after you’re done reading this is like, I need a funnel. Right? So strategically, he positions the book, so that it educates people about what the funnels are, how to sell and all this stuff, and it’s awesome. And it’s a reference manual for later, like I’ve come back to this when I’m working on webinars, structures and things like that. But I think the big job is to see if they’re a perfect fit for his software company.

Julie Eason:

So, yeah. So when we set out to start that book, actually, that book is more about building a mass audience, and building experts. And so the reason was okay, .comsecrets, the first book explained funnels, explained the steps, explained how any business can use it, whether they’re brick and mortar, dentists, or they’re online digital marketers or they’re e-commerce or whatever. He went through all of those different scripts and things. But then in the next book, he was like, “Okay, I want to reach [inaudible 00:24:25] arts audience. I want to reach all the people who are in the expert space,” because that was a huge, huge market already, and it was only going to get bigger.

Julie Eason:

So he was like, “I want all of those people to know that we have a tech solution for them.” But there’s a lot of barriers to entry, right? That they have to understand, before they even get to, “How am I going to sell my expertise?” They have to understand they’re an expert. They have to understand what they have to teach has a value. They have to understand how to build an audience. Because the heat… It’s really easy to buy a product, a software product without an audience yet and then feel like the product doesn’t work.

Chris Badgett:

Right.

Julie Eason:

So Expert Secrets actually built, it taught people how to build mass movements and mass audiences so that by the time you’re ready to launch something, you’ve got all the directions on how to do the launch and all that stuff but they’re going to naturally want your solution for the software. But there was steps that they had to go through first. And I mean, one of our other authors, Cristy “Code Red”, we wrote her book, The Code Red Revolution. When she started she was just a local nutrition coach. She was the number two boxer in the world. She was a badass, she was a celebrity trainer. But her passion was helping people lose weight and helping people who had given up all hope. People who are in their 70s, in wheelchair she helped them lose 100 pounds. She was badass at what she did. But she didn’t have a way to reach the masses with that.

Julie Eason:

And so she had a business coach who helped her to develop all the online system so that she could, expand her platform for how to help people. But she still needed to be able to reach the masses. And there’s this little ripple effect, it was amazing to watch her. Because now she’s a worldwide phenomenon. Code Red is huge. It’s amazing. And it works. It fricking works. Help me, right?

Chris Badgett:

So what job does her book do? What does it-

Julie Eason:

Her book, it inspires, educates and sells, right? So she had her things that she was selling, her custom programs, her coaching all of that, right? That’s great. But people had given up. And her primary message was, “You can lose weight without exercise.” Exercise, even though she is a fitness trainer, exercise doesn’t help you lose weight. It’s important-

Chris Badgett:

So that’s the differentiation or the positioning of-

Julie Eason:

That’s her positioning. What the book did was it gave her seven rules, which are so simple. I mean, all she wants you to do is drink water, eat real food and sleep. That’s not-

Chris Badgett:

But that’s what we want. We want easy.

Julie Eason:

Right.

Chris Badgett:

Like, “Give me operating principles that if I just commit, I’m going to get the results that doesn’t going to eat my lunch for time and money>”

Julie Eason:

Right. But if she had written a book, a quickie, “Just do this and you’ll… Just drink water and sleep more and you’ll lose 100 pounds.” Who’s going to believe that? Nobody. She’s going to get relegated to digital spammers and no one’s going to listen to her and she’s going to get a bad reputation and all of her legitimate work would be wasted. So most of that book is success stories.

Chris Badgett:

Awesome. So-

Julie Eason:

Most of the book is-

Chris Badgett:

… show don’t tell.

Julie Eason:

… proof. Yes.

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

It’s proof. It was before and after pictures. It was telling the stories. And every one of those stories, they were strategically put in there to bring up objections. “So I’m older. I’m 70 years old, I don’t believe I can do this.” “Well, we have a seventy year old woman in there who did it. Lost tons of weight. She’s happier than ever.” “I have fibromyalgia.” “I can’t do this.” “I have a husband who’s a trucker. All he wants to do is sit on the couch when he’s home and eat. And I can’t do this.” So all the reasons people think in their heads, “I can’t do this,” we put a success story in there that said, “they did it, you can do it.” So the whole goal of that book was to get people to believe they could do it and give them the tools to do it and say, “You’re also going to need accountability and support. So come join our revolution.”

Chris Badgett:

Yeah, this is a, I actually have some on my board, I just want to mention. Because we’re going back into the subconscious, the inner work that has to happen. So for a course creator, the external problem is lack of progress. The internal problem is confidence. And they have a philosophy, what I would call an error where they’re focusing on themselves and making money online and not focusing on getting results for other people. So I have to help people fix those things. To-

Julie Eason:

Shifting mindsets, yeah.

Chris Badgett:

I mean, they may blame the technology. But we got to get through all this other stuff if we’re going to be successful with our course, our membership side, or it’s going nowhere.

Julie Eason:

Right.

Chris Badgett:

And what I’ve seen happen so many times is people sabotage their course right before launch, because all this is unresolved.

Julie Eason:

Yes, exactly. Exactly. So that’s what a book does. Is it’s like, “Look, don’t buy this course yet. Don’t buy this software yet. You are not ready for that software. You are a badass at what you do. You know your stuff inside and out. You can help people. You can change the world when you get this course done. But here’s what you’re going to run into.” And I do this. Most of my job as a publisher is talking to authors off the ledge. Like they do it-

Chris Badgett:

That’s awesome.

Julie Eason:

… every single time. The highest level, famous people you know, they all do it and I did it too. And my team is like, “You’re doing that thing that you tell other people not to do.” Is we’re, like I said before, we’re naturally programmed to be humble and to be like, “I don’t know about this.” And so if you were to write a book, your job in that book would be to show people the journey of a course creator and all the places that their brain is going to try and take them off track. And then give them tools that you would do in person if you were coaching them through it.

Julie Eason:

And so if I was developing, like we’re developing a book for you right now, is say, “Here’s what you want. Here’s what you think is in the way, software, not sure what to say, have too many things to say. I don’t know how to get traffic,” all those things are what you think are standing in your way, what’s really standing in your way is confidence. And feeling like you have a lack of progress. So give them progress, give them ways that, “Here’s what you do, celebrate.” Here you get a sticker. And here’s some… All those gold stars you got in kindergarten, they worked. You got potty trained, eventually everybody did. Right?

Julie Eason:

So that’s just psychology at work and what that would do for you, Chris, if you had a book like that would get people ready to buy your course, and succeed as opposed to getting ready to buying the course first and then running into all those roadblocks and being like, “But you can do it.” They got-

Chris Badgett:

That’s awesome.

Julie Eason:

… to be ready before. So yeah, that’s-

Chris Badgett:

That is so cool. This is the stuff. So I’ve got the ClickFunnels Challenge, which is amazing. A Challenge Funnel is a different type of strategy for getting people interested but there’s a book inside here. And let’s see which book this is. And-

Julie Eason:

I don’t even know which book it is because I didn’t get that box.

Chris Badgett:

So there is the 30 Days Book.

Julie Eason:

Oh, yeah, yeah.

Chris Badgett:

Again, here we’re using a book to help warm up a lead, in this case it’s for a software company. But what is the job that this book does?

Julie Eason:

All right, look, that book. I did not write that book. Our company helped with the editing because like that… Look at how thick it is. Just hold it up.

Chris Badgett:

It’s two inches.

Julie Eason:

How does that feel in your hands?

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

How does it feel in your hands? It’s hard back.

Chris Badgett:

It feels like a hard heavy book. It’s not textbook big, but it’s pretty big.

Julie Eason:

Right. But it feels like a real book, right?

Chris Badgett:

Totally.

Julie Eason:

And when you… Flip through the pages a little bit so we can see it. What does it look like when you look at it?

Chris Badgett:

I mean, it’s full of pictures, diagrams.

Julie Eason:

Right. It doesn’t impossible.

Chris Badgett:

I see a lot of faces. I see a lot of faces. Yeah.

Julie Eason:

It doesn’t look impossible. So that book, is just like Cristy’s book, it is proof. That is what would you do if you had 30 days and you’re starting from nothing? So the whole book is inspiring stories and different models and different plans that people who’ve already succeeded, what would they do if everything was taken away and they had to start over? And there’s some brilliant stuff in there. I mean things, everybody has a different way of approaching things, you would think, “Well, I would do a Free Plus Shipping funnel,” and then I would do this and then I would do this and we’d all be the same. But people, they use software in so many different ways for so many different reasons, you got 30 people in there, or maybe 100 people, I don’t even remember how many people got in there. But it’s all stories. It’s inspiring, because they are saying they did it. You can do it too. It’s educating because it’s teaching you the different models. And it’s selling ClickFunnels.

Chris Badgett:

Right.

Julie Eason:

So if you did the same thing, you would take your top 50 people success stories for Lifter and you would say, “All right, so if you had to start all over again,” and this is a really good question.

Chris Badgett:

Okay, I was-

Julie Eason:

Because if you had to start over again, knowing how to succeed what’s the stuff you wish people had told you? “Just do it. You can do it.” All the self-confidence issues and all the self-doubt and sabotage. I mean, I have my nonfiction book academy. That thing was ready five years ago. I just had somebody yesterday contact me go, “I never logged in, can you give me my login?” Seriously? But I didn’t launch it. I put people through it and I got results for them. But I didn’t really launch it because I wasn’t confident that it was going to do the job because I felt like it was overwhelming. Because I didn’t do what I tell people to do now. I didn’t think from the outside and it I was like, “What do I know about everything, writing, publishing, marketing books?” Like it’s an entire PhD program about books in one course.

Julie Eason:

So now what I’ve done is I’ve splintered it out, according to the people’s problems. You can get the writing course, you can get the publishing course. And you don’t have to do one and the other. You can. Hopefully they’re going to go through the process so that they have a book that we’ve supported them all the way through. But they may not. They may already have a manuscript, they just need to know how to self-publish. And that’s cool too. So having all of that taken care of in book before they buy your stuff, they’re going to be like, “Chris is the guy. He’s the one who can get me to finally have a course that’s going to sell really well and he’s going to help me reach more people.” So that’s the benefit of those books.

Chris Badgett:

Yeah, that’s really incredible.

Julie Eason:

You want to write a book now, don’t you?

Chris Badgett:

Well, no. I mean, I actually resonate with what Russell said in his testimony, I’ve even told my team before, it’s been on my annual goal, like, “All right, this is the year I’m going to do a book.” Then-

Julie Eason:

This is the year, this is the year.

Chris Badgett:

… it didn’t happen, didn’t happen, didn’t happen.

Julie Eason:

And there’s a reason for that. And the reason for that is because you just don’t know how to write a book. You weren’t taught how to write books in school, and you were taught, what you were taught… And I call this is my new opportunity, okay?

Chris Badgett:

Okay.

Julie Eason:

Is the new rules of nonfiction. You were taught the old rules, and you were taught what was great for what you were doing. When you learned to write, in grade school, in high school, in college, doesn’t matter where it was, you were given the audience. It’s the teacher. You were given the purpose, explain the socio-economic implications of the French Revolution. Like, “Okay, I know what I have to put in here to reach my goal, which was to get a good grade.”

Julie Eason:

None of that applies when you’re writing a book to save your business or to grow your business. None of that applies. You have a completely different audience. They’re your customers, right? And are they your current customers? Or are they cold customers? And if they’re cold customers, how are you going to get them to warm up? And how are you going to get their attention? And why should they give a crap about that you if you’ve written, but they’ve never heard of you? So all of those things in audience, you’ve got to figure that out. You’ve got to figure out what are you going to teach them when you have decades and decades of knowledge.

Julie Eason:

And then you got to figure out well, what the heck is that book going to do for you? Why are you wasting two years of your life, which a lot of people feel like they’ve wasted all that time, when they just don’t know how to make it happen. They don’t know how… Even if I get a great manuscript and I don’t know how to publish it. And so what they do is they try to shortcut. And they try to get it out as fast as possible before the little Gremlins in your brain kick in.

Chris Badgett:

I’ve actually done that before.

Julie Eason:

So then, you’re going to write a book in a weekend. I’m going to-

Chris Badgett:

I did that.

Julie Eason:

Yeah.

Chris Badgett:

I did that. It’s on Amazon, it’s called-

Julie Eason:

Right, it’s on Amazon, you can get my book. It’s great.

Chris Badgett:

This is back in 2010, I wrote a book called… Because I’m really into leadership and management and I took my decade of experience in Alaska managing people in a remote area and wrote. I’ve challenged myself to write a book in a weekend exactly like you said. And-

Julie Eason:

And you can do it.

Chris Badgett:

… it wasn’t long. It was mostly, if you think about it, it’s more like 100 pages of tweets, condensed [crosstalk 00:37:40], ideas that are important in management and leadership. And I got that puppy down in a weekend. I was so proud of myself but when I look between that and writing a real book or whatever, it’s like there’s chasm.

Julie Eason:

Yeah, there’s a chasm and it’s because it’s like well, is that one really got… So there’s nothing wrong with writing a book of 100 tweets. If it’s done strategically for a certain reason. Like Steve Martin has a really great book out there about all of his tweets because he’s fricking hilarious and he’s a comedian. So it makes sense for him to put out a book with funny tweets in it. The chasm is that you just don’t know how to write a book. You know how to write an essay, you know how to write a creative writing piece, you know how to write an outline. I teach outlining completely different. I work with the chemicals in your brain and I work with… I’m just a neuroscience geek. So I want to make sure that you’re actually going to get the book done. So I organize and structure my outlines and my book development so that you will get it done. Know how to outline a lot.

Chris Badgett:

Outlining is super important to course creators too. So can you give us some insight into how-

Julie Eason:

I’ll give you… Here’s the whole secret, okay?

Chris Badgett:

Okay.

Julie Eason:

When you learned how to outline the formatting was more important than the content, right?

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

You were graded on whether you did the big letters and the big numbers and then the Roman numerals and then the little things and the teacher didn’t care what you were actually saying or trying to say in the actual outline, what was important was the format. And it was all done in bullet point structure, right? You put down, “Here’s my big thesis statement.” Okay. “Here’s my three things,” because it was always three. “And here’s the three or five sub things,” and they were all just bullet points and words or maybe a statement. But they were done in a way that they were declaratory. It was a period. How to make a course. How to market the course and then you would go down and digital marketing and driving traffic and all that would be like, you could put a period after each one of those things. There was a lot of pressure because if you look at your outline, and that topic says, how to drive traffic, or just-

Chris Badgett:

Or marketing. Yeah.

Julie Eason:

Or marketing.

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

What are you supposed to do with that? How are you supposed to make anything that makes any sense, because you have decades of experience and well, “Gee, I don’t know.” “All right, well, let’s break it down.” “Okay, marketing’s too big. So let’s break it down to online marketing and offline marketing.” Well, then we can break it down further, paid traffic and not paid. You can build an outline that’s 10 million miles long, and that’s what people do. And they think that that’s helping them write the course or write the book, and it’s not. All you have to do. Yes, you have to do that. That’s important. Turn those declaratory statements, those period statements into questions. If I say, “Chris, what’s the best way to drive traffic to a course?”

Chris Badgett:

I would do a-

Julie Eason:

Can you do that?

Chris Badgett:

… free course lead magnet.

Julie Eason:

So what is that free course lead magnet? I don’t understand those words. What does that include?

Chris Badgett:

It’s a mini course that solves a problem quickly that gets people to sign up on your websites, you have their email address and gets them to trust you so that it becomes easier to sell to them.

Julie Eason:

So what do I need to have in place to do that? I need a website?

Chris Badgett:

Well, if you already have a WordPress website, you could just install LifterLMS and create a free course.

Julie Eason:

So the free course, how does that get money if it’s free?

Chris Badgett:

Well, it’s part of a funnel. So the first step is you’re just doing education based marketing. So you help people, and you mentioned Frank Kern earlier in this episode, what he’s been saying literally over and over for a decade is, “Help somebody get a result in advance of asking for the sale.” That’s Frank Kern’s strategy. That’s what you’re doing. You just help people get a result for free, and then you sell them the next phase, and you keep going.

Julie Eason:

Did you have any problem answering any of those questions?

Chris Badgett:

Not at all.

Julie Eason:

You just wrote two pages of a book.

Chris Badgett:

Right.

Julie Eason:

In about 30 seconds. Just by adding a question mark to the end of marketing a course. So we call it a question based outline. What it does, your brain is wired to answer questions. You can’t help yourself. You know-

Chris Badgett:

I was watching you messing with my psychology, I was like hey-

Julie Eason:

I know. I was like, “How can I screw with this? This is great.”

Chris Badgett:

Exactly. It was fun. I was like, “Oh, this is not hard it’s easy.”

Julie Eason:

Great, I know.

Chris Badgett:

Like outline stresses me out.

Julie Eason:

Right. Because there’s too much to say and then logged in. And you’re like, “What’s most important? What do they really have to know?” You know what to put in the outline. And if people do this, and they write their bit… And they come to me all the time, “Here’s my outline.” I’m like, “Great. You know what? You’ve got a lot of stuff in here.” We teach them to have the… The high level topics can be topics, that’s fine. Then underneath that, let’s start writing questions and you just write question, question, question, question. And if you can’t answer any of those questions in less than 10 minutes, either it’s too big or you need to go do some research and you don’t know the answer, or you’re bullshitting.

Julie Eason:

So what that means is, is you can write a book in 10 minutes at a time. Because you just have a big list of questions. This is how we ghostwrite. We do a book development session that takes a few hours, that makes sure that it’s going to meet your goals, we know the audience, we know all this stuff, and we’ve build this outline. And it’s question-based, which means that our authors, all they have to do is answer the question. Now, does that mean they can just take a transcript? This is what people are going to, “Oh, yeah, I can just answer questions and get a transcript and then I’ll publish it, then it’ll be great.” No. That is done all the time. And he ends up with really crappy books. Because you don’t speak the same way that you read.

Chris Badgett:

What’s the danger of a crappy book?

Julie Eason:

Oh, my God. So word of mouth, right? Your whole goal-

Chris Badgett:

I refer people to this book.

Julie Eason:

All the time. Right?

Chris Badgett:

If it sucked, I wouldn’t do that.

Julie Eason:

You wouldn’t do it. And it doesn’t mean it has to be fact. There’s a book called Obvious Adams, it was written in the 1920s. It’s a parable and it’s teeny, brilliant. So I’m not saying it has to be thick for it to be real or legitimate. It just has to be strategic and planned and you have to actually do book development and figure it out, plan the strategy before you start writing, that makes a real book. The danger is you damage your business, you damage your credibility, people think you’re an idiot and your customers are like, “This is stupid.”

Julie Eason:

And you hope that nobody reads your book. You have a best selling author title, because some company promised you a best seller, which I will tell you right now, doesn’t mean you sold more than 10 books. People get really upset when they find that out, but they have the title and it’s a perceived title and like, “Oh, I’m a best selling author, but don’t go read my book. I don’t ever want to tell anybody to read. You don’t know the title of my book,” because we don’t want anyone to read it.

Julie Eason:

and it’s a shame because it’s not that you didn’t care about what were putting in there. It’s not that you didn’t want to write a really great book, you just didn’t know how. “Just want to have my course.” Like, “Let me show you the structure that has to happen. Let me show you how to organize the chapters so that people can become addicted to going to the next page.” There’s a technique for that, to make sure that they’re going to get everything and that things actually sink into the brain and they get it. Instead of just reading and going, “Oh, that was interesting.” Or not reading it at all, or not getting to the next chapter. Like people save the good stuff for the end or they won’t want to share everything that they’ve got because we want people to go buy the course. They’re not going to buy the course if they can’t even get through the book.

Chris Badgett:

I got a question for you before we wrap up. So one of the things I like about Russell’s style is he has a lot of diagrams. I remember he’s always drawing and he’s talking about pain island, pleasure island. There’s all these sharks and I’m like, “Gosh, that’s such a good teaching tool.” My business coach Dan Martell, does that stuff with all these frameworks and diagrams and models. And he introduced me to someone named Simon Bowen who helps people develop models and think in terms of models. I really get a lot. I learned a ton from Simon and I’m really glad I came across him. But what role, like you can see I’m a mine mapper, I got my maps and stuff. But some people draw, some people… How can these drawings, models, frameworks, diagrams, help in the writing process?

Julie Eason:

In the writing process, that’s how you educate. Inspire, educate, sell. You inspire with stories, you educate with frameworks, and you sell with additional resources and support and calls to action. But the frameworks themselves need to be so obvious and so easy to understand otherwise, they are useless. You have to layer the complicated on top of the skeleton that’s already familiar. So Russell does his stick figure drawings they’re not intimidating, right? People aren’t-

Chris Badgett:

Are those his original drawings? Or-

Julie Eason:

Not his handiwork, but he’s-

Chris Badgett:

Yeah, yeah.

Julie Eason:

Yes his drawing, his idea.

Chris Badgett:

He’s a doodler or whatever.

Julie Eason:

Yeah. He doodles all the time. He teaches on webinars with whiteboards and doodles and he has these things called man makers. He’s like, “I want a man maker. The big fat markers.” And he draws on when he’s doing big presentations from stages, big markers. But yeah, he draws. But neurologically in your brain, so the more lobes that you can hit in the brain, there’s all the different lobes, temporal and parietal and all those, the more that you can light up in the course of teaching your content, so courses or books or webinars, whatever, the more they’re going to get it and keep it and retain it and pay attention.

Julie Eason:

So what that means is there’s the reading, you’re going to read this stuff, great. But also you know that, “Oh, I don’t get this picture right now, at the beginning of a chapter, but I know by the time I read through this stuff, I will understand it and then that picture reminds me and I know exactly what to do when I look at that picture.” So that’s lighting up a different part of the brain. You can also use music like Brendon Burchard is a master at using music to change people’s state. Tony Robbins, same thing. He uses the same songs. Expert Academy has been using the same music for like 15 years. You go in there and it’s like, “Oh, that music’s playing means, I got to my seat.” “Oh, means he’s coming out.” “Oh, I’m supposed to clap now.” Like it triggers, right?

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

You don’t want to clap? Those introverts are like, “I hate this. Do I have to do it. Damn it.” So it’s powerful. It triggers. So if you can put music into your courses as brain triggers, awesome. If you can use audio logos. If you guys haven’t gotten an audio logo, that’s amazing. Like, doo doo doo, what does that mean? Or the emergency broadcast system, you know what it means as soon as you hear that sound, right? So you’re lighting up different areas of the brain. And so the more of that you can do, the better. And there’s a brilliant book that we wrote, called Brain-centric Design, that talks all about how to teach the stuff. In fact, you should probably get those guys on here, because they’re all about teaching for deep understanding, and they would be brilliant for your course creators. But yeah, the more that you can trigger the brain in different ways, the better. So absolutely, pictures. I mean, comic books, brilliant, right?

Chris Badgett:

Yeah.

Julie Eason:

You can do a comic book as a teaching tool, as a legitimate book that actually does the things because it’s pictures and words, because you still got to have the right words. You gotta have the right words that do the teaching enough. Otherwise, it’s just pictures and it’s like, “Well, that was cool, but I don’t get it.”

Chris Badgett:

Julie you’re amazing. I’m going to have to watch this, because I’m having to be the interviewer. But I’m definitely going to be watching again later and making sure I got it all. I’m really excited just to-

Julie Eason:

It’s just so much fun. I mean, I can do this all day long. I love helping people just get their messages out and get it organized in their brain so that they can actually move forward. Because you’re right, people get so frustrated with feeling like they’re not making progress. And with a book, I mean, it takes time to write a book. It just does. Even if you’re only doing 10 minutes a day, it’s going to take time. And you’ve got to have those points where it’s like, “Yes, I did a chapter again.” You have somebody else who’s going, “Yeah.” So that’s where, accountability and all of that comes in, but yeah.

Chris Badgett:

Well, tell us about Nonfiction Book Academy. What is it, what’s inside?

Julie Eason:

Sure. So Nonfiction Book Academy is my solution to $50,000 ghost writing packages. Because it’s like-

Chris Badgett:

So it’s self-paced, do it yourself?

Julie Eason:

It’s a self-paced, it’s do it yourself. And what we did is we took out… It’s all brand new, so it’s my new… I’m so much better at teaching this stuff now than I was when I first made the course. I made the course to be all the writing you needed to know, all the editing you needed to know, all the publishing, should you go traditional publishing or self-publishing? If you choose to go self-publishing, here’s how to do it. I did everything. The marketing, I mean, all of it, and it was so fricking overwhelming. And that’s what inside of me it was like, “It’s just too big. It’s just too big.” And so let’s do one chunk at a time.

Julie Eason:

So we have the writing masterclass, which is available now, the publishing masterclass will be available in a few weeks. And then marketing masterclass. We want to make sure that these authors get just what they need to actually keep going. And we have a community so that they can go in and ask questions, because I’m not available all the time, but at least they can go and ask questions and either me or my managing editor or my publishing director will go in and answer the questions. So people have somewhere to go. I mean, it’s so hard to write a book in a vacuum. It’s really hard.

Julie Eason:

So we want to support those people. And the academy is just a place where it’s like, I don’t know where it’s going to go from here. I mean, I may just do a whole ton of ancillary courses that are all around marketing your book and using your book to build a course. My book, The Profitable Business Author, is all about courses. It’s like, “Look, you don’t want to write a book and not have a course because you’re not going to make any money.” No one’s going to pay attention. So having a course for me was necessary. And it’s funny because I had the course before I had the book, and then I was like, “I need to write a book.” Because I’m telling people that they need to write a book.

Chris Badgett:

That’s awesome. So if you want to get into the book business or build a book funnel, or build your authority or clarify your thinking, go check out Nonfiction Book Academy. If you have the resources and you have a content person on your team, send them into that so that they can-

Julie Eason:

And they’re adorable.

Chris Badgett:

Yeah. So they can help lead that project up for your business. Julie, I’m so glad that Nicole Haulin connected us.

Julie Eason:

Oh, me too. We never would have figured it out on our own at the Farmers Market.

Chris Badgett:

We should definitely do a webinar down the road if you’re open for that, because-

Julie Eason:

Absolutely.

Chris Badgett:

… I have like a billion more questions I want to ask you, maybe we’ll do another podcast episode at some point as well. But thank you for coming on. Thank you for writing this book with Russell, because it’s had a big impact on the industry that I’m in. I mean, I see your footprints everywhere and people don’t always realize with like, for me as an example, I’m the face of the business and my support team will get emails that start with like, “Hi Chris,” or whatever, but there’s a team of other people that are making the magic happen. And you’re part of that story with Expert Secrets. I just interviewed somebody, just yesterday, who’s one of the Two Comma Club people, his name was Dean Holland.

Julie Eason:

Oh, I love Dean. Yes, he’s amazing. He’s amazing.

Chris Badgett:

And Dean’s story and everything, you’re a part of helping him find success and stuff which is amazing.

Julie Eason:

That’s what’s important about that everybody watching this needs to know is that the reason I write books for other people instead of for myself is because I want their impact in the world to be felt. And when I can go to Funnel Hacking Live and I can look at the Two Comma Club award ceremony which now lasts for two… It’s like going to graduation and there’s literally hundreds of people lining the walls, getting their awards and walking across the-

Chris Badgett:

And for people who don’t know, Two Comma Club winner is, correct me if I’m wrong, but they’ve made a million dollars.

Julie Eason:

Yeah.

Chris Badgett:

… with their funnel, right?

Julie Eason:

With one funnel.

Chris Badgett:

With one funnel.

Julie Eason:

Yeah. And so it’s that moment. It’s that’s the inspiration that hits their brain when they’re sitting in the audience, going, “I’m going to be there next year.” That’s what keeps them going, is that award which is great, and it’s the coolest award ever honestly, Russell, I’ll tell you, he did it because he really wanted to have something to really focus people. Then he had to make Two Comma Club X because people were making ten million dollars. Now he literally has one that’s for 25, 50, 75 and 100 million dollars. And there are people who have all of them filled in.

Chris Badgett:

Oh my gosh.

Julie Eason:

It’s astounding. And I-

Chris Badgett:

And you’re a part of that story.

Julie Eason:

And I’m part of that. I get to be part of that and say, “I did that.” And it’s really cool. Because that’s an impact that’s worth having in the world. And so if you really believe your impact is worth having in the world, write a damn book, you do it yourself, let me help you, hire somebody, whatever. I don’t care how you do it, but write a book because they get passed around. People talk about them. It’s the best way to get word of mouth for your business.

Chris Badgett:

Julie Eason. She’s a Thanet House Publishing. You can find her at thanethousebooks.com/LMScast we’ve got something for you there. Julie, thank you so much for coming on the show and inspiring the people today. Really appreciate it.

Julie Eason:

You’re so welcome. You’re so welcome.

Chris Badgett:

And that’s a wrap for this episode of LMScast. I’m your guide Chris Badgett, I hope you enjoyed the show. This show was brought to you by LifterLMS, the number one tool for creating, selling, and protecting engaging online courses to help you get more revenue, freedom, and impact in your life. Head on over to lifterlms.com and get the best gear for your course creator journey. Let’s build the most engaging, results getting courses on the internet.

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